Monday, July 06, 2009

Negative articles about SIngapore in Malaysiakini

The 1st one : "I curse the day I was born a Singaporean" [Link].
The 2nd one : "The hidden ugly side of Singapore" [Link].

The 1st article, I think you have to make up your own mind after reading it. The person who wrote it has not lived life in Malaysia under the NEP so he may not know what it is like. The grass can look greener on the other side and we all have to be careful of this when we form opinions.

The 2nd article from someone who previously worked in KL, moved to Singapore and had a shock when he found out how poorer Singaporeans lived their lives. I don't know if this story is true but I know it CAN be true....it can be true that someone from KL can get a shock when they find out how some Singaporeans lived especially if the person spends most of his life in KL. There are other rural parts of Malaysia where I've been to where you share your food with flies all the time....where small "shopping centers" have big posters to tell you they are air-conditioned.

Two years ago, I received an invitation to attend my cousin's wedding in KL. I was a bit reluctant to go but I had some frequent flyer miles that were expiring soon so I agreed to take my mom to the wedding. The cousin is the daughter of my mother's cousin, my uncle, a chinese educated electrician living in Muar.

When I got the wedding card, I actually had a surprise because the groom had an Indian name. I asked my mom about it and he told me the groom was half-Indian - his mom was Chinese. I was told that my uncle who was a bit of a "traditional chinese" feller was completely charmed by his future son-in-law who not only spoke mandarin and also his dialect, hokkien. For the wedding, I had to stay at the hotel where the wedding was held. Some of the Malaysian guests drove 8 hours to get to hotel and back. The wedding had a friendly atmosphere with many friends of the couple in the 20s and 30s from church and university attending the wedding.
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The day after the wedding, I met the wedding couple at the hotel lobby. I told them I had a full day in KL because my flight was at night. My mom was interested in doing some shopping but not sure where to go. The couple offered to show us around KL and their new home somewhere in Klang Valley. I was a bit worried that they would be tired after the wedding but they assured us that they were well rested and would really like to show us around since we "came all the way from Singapore". I had been to KL a number of times but had never visited anyone's home in KL. The couple's new home was a 1800 sq ft condominium unit complete with a swimming pool and LRT station nearby. The couple had been working for 2 years as IT professionals before they got married. They told me that "most young couples these days prefer condominiums to landed property nowadays in KL". They owned a proton-something car too. So I guess life for IT guys in KL is not too bad.......so it is possible they can get a shock when they come to work in Singapore and see something they cannot imagine from all the wonderful reports about Singapore, the affluent island state and the 1st world nation. They get to see first hand what it is like to be poor in Singapore and that shocks them.
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"Have you seen a HDB flat and how it looks like? Bring your whole family for a dinner using public transport and then rush to catch the last bus. Is this what a 10% growth rate a year is about that we want boast? Does this growth figures mean anything in the first place? Do we want to open our country to expats so that they can progress at the expense of our own Malaysians? Do we want to 'progress' to a level that even our children can't buy a house in our own land? Last, I ask myself. Do we Malaysians look at GDP growth as the only measure to choose our government or are we much more matured than that? Achievement at whose expense?"
- Vijay Kumar
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Before you get to the article, I want to say in my younger days, I travelled all over Malaysia Penang, Pahang, KL, Johor, Malacca, Terengganu, Sabah etc. A large part of Malaysia consists of kampungs and small towns. The people in these towns are not rich. By Singapore standards, they are dirt poor and probably make less than the lowest 20% of our population (below $1200). The cost of living is extremely low and in many parts of Malaysia, the cost of home is the cost building the house as land is plentiful. There is poverty but it is a different kind of poverty from we are seeing in Singapore.
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http://www.malaysiakini.com/
Quote:
The hidden ugly side of Singapore
Vijay Kumar Jul 3, 09 6:48pm

In between the glamarous buildings and shoppings complexes of this city state, there is huge suffering that the world has never seen. Something that the Singapore government or media will try to hide from the rest of the world. And this is the lives of 80 percent of 'true' Singaporeans who live in the republic's Housing Development Board (low cost) flats. I, like many young youths, went looking for a better future in this Lion City of opportunity, After four years of working experience in Kuala Lumpur. It was my first experience outside Malaysia and I was very happy to be offered a job in Singapore with a basic salary of S$3,500. Then, with huge hopes, I started looking for a master bedroom to rent being single.
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I finally got a master bedroom in Clementi for S$700 a month but only after being rejected by many other landlords for being Indian. The ensuing eight- month ordeal that I spent in this HDB flat really opened my mind to what Singapore is for those who can't earn. It made me ask if this is the type of development that I ever wanted in my country Malaysia. This is the first time that I felt gifted to be born in Malaysia. Anyway, I lived with a family of three (husband, wife with one daughter) who rented out their master bedroom to me while they slept in the common room. It was a three-room flat (but unlike in Malaysia, a three-room flat has only two bedrooms). I did not believe it was the master bedroom that I was staying in until I went into the other room and saw that there is no attached bathroom there. I was given a bed and a mattress and also two fans. Then I noticed that the couple with their daughter sleeping on the floor with a thin mattress in the other room. Not even a fan in that room. Both husband and wife are born Singaporeans and were employed. It was after one month that I realised that the daughter was not going to school regularly and most of the time there would be a quarrel in the early morning between the father and daughter as there was not enough money to pay for the bus to go to school. There were times when the daughter was very sick and father had no money to take her to see a doctor. It was a real pain in the heart to hear a small girl suffering through the thin walls of this HDB flat. It was unbelievable for me to see this happening in this ultra-modern city. It took me another two months to realise that what was happening in this flat was not an isolated case of urban poverty in Singapore. It was every where in those HDB flats. There was a Chinese neighbour (an elderly man) and his son had no money to get a taxi to send his father to the clinic for daily diabetic wound-dressing. I soon understood that poverty in Singapore transcends racial boundaries. The whole family of my landlord got a shock that I own a car in Malaysia. My landlord would keep pestering me every time I come back to Malaysia to bring my car over so that his whole family could go sightseeing in Singapore. In all my life, I never believed people in a developed country like Singapore would ever consider car ownership a privelege.Three months later, one fine day, I came back home and realised that there was no electricity in the house. This time, my landlord did not have the money to pay for the utility bills. I was back in the Stone Age, using candles. This lasted for days until finally he borrowed money from somewhere and settled the bills. My landlord as a person I have known during that period never come back drunk or looked like a gambler. He had to pay for his mother's medical expenses, that much I know.
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This was the time in my life when I learned what is was like to live in that poor quality HDB flat, drying clothes in the rooms and listening to what the couple talked about in the next room via the thin walls. It was this time in life that made me to think, 'Is this what I want Malaysia to be? For those who talk great or look up to Singapore's success, have they ever come and lived in Singapore like I how I did? Have you seen a HDB flat and how it looks like? Bring your whole family for a dinner using public transport and then rush to catch the last bus. Is this what a 10% growth rate a year is about that we want boast? Does this growth figures mean anything in the first place? Do we want to open our country to expats so that they can progress at the expense of our own Malaysians? Do we want to 'progress' to a level that even our children can't buy a house in our own land? Last, I ask myself. Do we Malaysians look at GDP growth as the only measure to choose our government or are we much more matured than that? Achievement at whose expense?

38 comments:

Onlooker said...

The sad thing is that there are people who are striving to survive with a family to feed in Singapore whileour garment made up excuses like no singaporean want to do job a and so need a FW(who is levied and pay push to the barest level) to do the job.

And yet when these FW returned home the pay they received is high enough to allow them to buy landed propety with a vehicle and no ERP GANTRY only the highway toll.

And never forget that in turn of performance,They do not need to serve NS.And any promotion prospect is automatically given to...

Such Irony.

Anonymous said...

"...I don't know if this story is true but I know it CAN be true....it can be true that someone from KL can get a shock when they find out how some Singaporeans lived especially if the person spends most of his life in KL..."

What the second article has said is true. I am a true blue Singaporean but currently working as a lecturer in a private university in KL (left NTU last year). I can testify to what has been said in the second article. Malaysia is indeed a much better place to live in than Singapore. If u don't believe it, get a job here and you can see for yourself. Honest.

Anonymous said...

how true, how true.
Just came back from KL over the weekend for a wedding dinner.
Visited a relative house and you know what, it's a 2 stories town house in a nice environment and it cost less than my 4 rm 30 year old HDB flat. Probably there's enough change for me to get a car for myself and my spouse.

Anonymous said...

Well, my best friend who work in JB (in a medium-sized factory) had a female clerk under his hand. The female clerk only earn RM 1200 / SG 500 per month and can afford to own a car (kancil something - a very small car produced by malaysia-car maker). That really amazed me.

Anonymous said...

"Do we want to open our country to expats so that they can progress at the expense of our own Malaysians?"



MY is different. in sg's context, ft policy may be only the way to go. all over asia, cheap workers are migrating from the provinces to the cities or economic zones. we do not have a hinterland, i suppose our gov came out with the ft policy to match that.

only problem is with the way that our ft policy is implemented.

when a talented chinese comes from the rural province to become a banker in shanghai, the chinese nationals there have got nothing to say. the competition afterall is among the citizens of a country.

it is the same entity, same colours of flags, one people.

but it is not the same when a chinese effortlessly comes to sg to take up a good job at the expense of singaporeans. to make it worse, there is no compensation whatsover for the displaced locals and virtually little barriers to entry for the foreigners.

a foreigner can have a good headstart in a developed country by getting into the sg's educational system early, then get a good job in sg while the locals are serving their NS liabilities.

many have noted these lopsided aspects of our system. foreigners have an edge over the locals in alot of aspects. perhaps we shud be welcoming these foreigners warmly even if they are laughing behind our backs.

Anonymous said...

It is eye opener for malaysian.

Anonymous said...

The only surprising thing about the story is the Malaysian guy did not encounter loan shark runners splashing pain on the doors of HDB dwellers. I wonder if he is so lucky not to see any of that, or he forgot to write about it or this story is just fictitious as it show things to be far better than it really is in Singapore.

Anonymous said...

Many of the homes of HDB dwellers are really run down, especially those in mature estates. They desperately need a fresh coat of paint, new furniture and repairs. Yet the government wastes money on upgrading the surroundings.

New HDB flats are built in ulu areas without much amenities. These so called affordable flats (200k for 4 rm) are located near factories, workers' quarters, and require you to bear with noise, malaria threat, poor air quality, inconvenient transport and foreign workers swamping the area.

This is the so called good quality of life the government tells us we are living.

Anonymous said...

I would love to move to Malaysia as the cost of living is relatively lower and standard of living higher. But ....... when you see a bumi politician bringing a kris and held it up in parliament and utter racial stuffs, it make me rubbish the ideas.

Anyone has experience other alternative lower cost and higher standard countries to share? like Vietnam?

Anonymous said...

It is really a joke. HDB - the original idea is to provide low cost housing to people.

Look at HDB price now? I think it will take me a decade or two to pay it off.

Are our government profiting from their own citizen? Does building a HDB cost so much to the government?

There is too much FW in Singapore and most of them holds little loyalty to Singapore.

2 years ago, I was looking around for scholarship to fund my further studies and I realise the course i am interested in studying does not offer scholarship to local but to Foreigner. The irony is my grades are better then most of them in the course.

Anonymous said...

Even without comparing Singapore with anotther country the glaring facts in this country already tell a good enough story.

What makes Singapore increasingly hard to live in especially for the young generation is something planned by PAP.

Someone has this pet 'survival of the fittest' theory about society, that if people can be kept struggling for survival they won't have the time and energy to think of democratic rights & freedoms that can only make things less easy for the government.

Hence you see cost of essentials like public housing, transportation, utilities, commercial properties rental, healthcare continually raised and very drastically at times in various ways to calibrate the comfort level for the majority, to keep it just below the threshold of pain, a level that is still bearable but not painful enough to create a mass revolt at the polls.

But for some unlucky fellows, life can be hell. The other day, an old taxi driver showed me about 5 traffic summons for speeding on expressways ranging from around $150 to $170. Serious. He showed them to me because he thought I was skeptical. Even though I thought that taxi driver was just too careless and stupid, that case does demonstrate how mercilessly PAP treats the ordinary people. Why such heavy penalty for speeding when $50 a summon would be enough deterrent for the average driver.

It is a case of strategizing if not scheming to use a stronger word, against the people using money-extracting means to keep them on the threadmill of survival-driven lifestyle.

I am not the only one who has this perception of PAP's style of running Singapore. A number of Singaporeans have said the same thing to me.

On the other hand, PAP also have to watch how business costs might affect the market if Singaporeans demand for higher pay to keep up with cost of living. PAP solves this by importing foreign talents and labour by countless numbers.

Have you noticed that now there is now a big wave of Filipinos taking over administrative, sales and technical positions in the job market? No need to wait for the IRs to open and be filled with 10 thousands Filipinos workers. Now the phenonmenon is already here.

Like foreign talents from India and China many years back, such imports keep wages under control so that Singaporeans themselves will never see their salaries raised enough to be comfortable to entertain democratic rights and freedoms.

Anonymous said...

anon 11:36

the low level jobs, taxi driving, canteen and macdonald's housekeeping will be held be singaporeans; the good jobs, you have dun to lose sleep over, the china chinese, hongkies, angmohs, filippinos, malaysians, indians, vietnamese have enuff talents to crowd out that segment.

Anonymous said...

hey anon 11:06,

I had the same experince too... Most of the so called asian scholars have got significantly worse grades than the locals, yet they get bond free scholarships.

Anonymous said...

anon 11:36 PM

I think your example of fining the taxi driver $150 for speeding is not appropriate to show PAP control. Those who drive will know how reckless some drivers are (especially taxi drivers). Innocent lives are at stake. If you ask me, the punishments are too lenient. There simply exist a group of Singaporeans who will not do the right thing if punishments do not exist.

Anonymous said...

My retired parents who have relatives in Malaysia are talking about retiring there. I told them not to, because this would be exactly what the PAP wanted, chuck out the old batteries and replace them with new fresh foreign ones. Instead I tell my parents to stay on in Singapore and make their votes count.

Majullah Singapura!

yamizi said...

Vijay missed the 'NS experience'

Anonymous said...

More and more locals are expected to take up jobs at $1000 per mth, and endure long working hours and poor working conditions.

And the scary part is, employers are incredulous and indignant that locals are unwilling to accept low wages and poor working conditions.

Is this the direction our country is headed towards?

Alan Wong said...

Just the other day, my friend who is a taxi driver commented he has to work longer hours as earnings has dropped since those stupid regulations implemented by LTA scholars who has no inkling of the hardships faced by taxi drivers.

For example all those surcharges during peak periods has driven away many potential passengers, and leaving many taxi drivers resorting to all kind of tricks in order to survive in this man-eat-man world created by LTA. Taxi drivers can now be frequently seen making last minute u-turns in order to catch awaiting passengers on the other side of the road. Touts have also become a common sight awaiting passengers to alight from express bus arrivals.

How has LTA and taxi companies help the working lives of these taxi drivers when at the end of the day, taxi drivers suffer from fatigue and stress competing with each other for more passengers in order to at least pay for the rent and diesel costs which keep on rising.

In the larger context, has PAP really help those in the lower income bracket maintain their earnings when costs keep on increasing ? It is made worse when our govt allow the increasing intake of foreign workers & foreign talent, a lot of jobs are now being snatched away from Singaporeans in the lower income group.

It may be true that there may be few Singaporeans keen for cleaner jobs but what about the average job such as technicians, customer service officers, bank tellers, managers, where we can find these jobs taken over by an ever-increasing foreign nationals.

The largest presence felt must have been Chinese nationals who upon becomin PRs has taken over a lot of jobs from local Singaporeans.

One cannot help concluding that our PAP govt is actually gambling with the future of the Singapore by ensuring that PAP will survive by increasing the intake of foreign nationals to counter balance any threat of growing local political dissent.

Politics are dirty, anyway.

Anonymous said...

To Anon@11:36 PM

"Hence you see cost of essentials like public housing, transportation, utilities, commercial properties rental, healthcare continually raised and very drastically at times in various ways to calibrate the comfort level for the majority, to keep it just below the threshold of pain, a level that is still bearable but not painful enough to create a mass revolt at the polls."

Kinda of agree, all the civil services are watchdogs to increase cost if peasants save too much $$ so as to make them work harder & harder and no more energy to think of reform..

Anonymous said...

It is now quite common to hear Singaporeans saying that PAP is just one big money-making machine.

They always like to add that PAP is therefore "very smart" or "li hai" because of this. I told them "unprincipled" would be a better qualification for PAP.

Why do I say this?

Now I ask you a question "What is wrong with gambling that there are laws in most countries against it?"

I think it is because gambling can easily lead to an addiction and it can destroy one's lifestyle and family even.

PAP like many other government has laws against illegal gambling. But then it saw that illegal but lucrative 4-D outlets were hard to control.

Then an 'aha' came to PAP's mind: Lets beat these illegal 4-D operators to it by becoming the master operator and make tons of money out of it. And hence PAP became the king of legal 4-D outlets.

This is how a regulation has been turned on its head.

What happened to the principle behind the law against gambling? Does'nt matter to PAP anymore.

Aiyah, today the whole of Singapore has become a gambling ground long before people started talking about what the casinos of the IRs might do to Singaporeans.

Now not only Singaporeans, foreign labourers who earn just a few hundred dollars monthly are seen queueing up at 4-D outlets everywhere.

Of course PAP is laughing its way to the bank.

Just betting taxes alone collected by PAP comes to $1.5B annually LINK.

Can't imagine what would be the takings by Singapore Pools.

To put a long story short: Regulations have become tools for PAP to generate vast revenues, and NOT that those revenues would benefit the ordinary Singaporeans in the end.

You can say the same thing for heavy traffic fines and other court fines.

Regulations deforming into avenues for generating exorbitant revenues.

Anonymous said...

"Someone has this pet 'survival of the fittest' theory about society, that if people can be kept struggling for survival they won't have the time and energy to think of democratic rights & freedoms that can only make things less easy for the government."

Someone has this pet 'supplying drugs to the fittest' theory about society, that if people can be fed with huge pay checks they won't have the time and energy to think of democratic rights & freedoms that can only make things less easy for the government.

Anonymous said...

someone has this "singaporeans are ungrateful" theory, now they are paying for it.

Anonymous said...

Recently told to me by a Malaysian:

"I worked in Singapore for 15 years and for 15 years I suffered man. Just work and go home and completely no time to enjoy life at all.. Now I'm living in JB, its much better here, at least I can sit down with my friends and have time to think about and live my life."

Anonymous said...

Not everyone is fortunate! I empathized with the family the author Vijay was living with.

The amount of reject and difficulty he had in renting a room should speak volume to the contrast of the empathy stage of HDB owner he had tried to generalize.

It is sad that gament trying to encourage these so called 'foreign talents', who are willing to worked for lower pay, but still be able to afford a house and a car in their homeland, are laughing at the hand that are feeding them.
Hope that they loss their job here, so that they can balek kampong, to see if they can get a good life in their hometown.
(Maybe they already kena fired, and cannot get a job, that's why he so sore).

I am not sure if Vijay did check on the identity of those beggars in Singapore, how many of them are Malaysians?

When I was asking a KL friend, on how is KL's life recently, during their visit to Singapore, they told me the crime rate there is very bad, it is not safe to go out there at night.

Another friend of mine, she is Singaporean. When the father, a Malaysian suffered a brain hemorrhage, they had to drive out to KL to bring the father to Singapore hospital to seek medical treatment. I asked them if they find the high risk to travel the distance. They answered that they believed her father would not survived if he will to be admitted into a hospital there.

Although I strongly agreed that the cost of living in this city state is pretty high. If only we had a solution to it, then that is perfect.

We should sent this so called 'foreign talents' like Vijay back home, if he is still working here, to make a better living for our own Singaporean.

Just Me

Anonymous said...

>Anon 1.21pm "I worked in Singapore for 15 years ...... to think about and live my life."

He is smart, "he just work and go home and completely no time to enjoy life at all" so he save all his money up, and now that he can enjoyed his life back at his hometown. we should learn from him, but not enjoy it in Johore....with the money.

Lets find out the ending of his story in a few years time, it may be amazing, Johore is known for high crime rate.

Anonymous said...

No point having so many foreign talents in Singapore. It's PAP that wants so many to fill the positions in the industry at lower salary. It has nothing to do with enhancing or even protecting the livelihood of Singaporeans which already by definition included an enormous number of Malaysian PRs.

The GDP figure will not reflect the standard living of Singaporeans, this for sure, because PAP already mapped out in advance how much Singaporeans ought to get.

It is a case of centralized control not retribution of wealth. It is dictatorship and feudalism aided by modern information technology to track people's income and business turnovers across the board and then cream off the excess the moment it appears.

Anonymous said...

Bring your whole family for a dinner using public transport and then rush to catch the last bus.

Realize that it is only last Christmas eve that MRT trains last train is at 3.00a.m.

Even we ask for last train to be later a bit on eve of important public holidays, they refused for so long as profit margins from night owls is higher.

Normal days are really need to rush for the last bus.

Anonymous said...

I think it is because gambling can easily lead to an addiction and it can destroy one's lifestyle and family even.

The government is doing something about this.

Quite some Mediacork dramas are inputting messages, as with other messages that government wants us to listen and obey are inout in Mediacork dramas. The one that ended its run last night, the Li Nanxing character added in an anti-gambling message before reuniting with Cythia Koh.

But 4D betting stations and casinos continue to open.

Anonymous said...

I believe that the many comments echo similar feelings and truths that surround Singapore.

I am Singaporean. But I do not enjoy being in Singapore. I do not enjoy being ousted from a job just because the other applicant is a foreigner yet with less experience. I do not enjoy seeing my father being retrenched with no compensation, losing his job to another foreigner who will be paid at 1/2 the salary.

In retrospect, the PAP has proven my own findings true, that I wouldn't be able to live comfortably in my own country. The government has moulded Singapore to be an HR pool, much like worker ants in an ant hill, providing cheaper labour to attract foreign investors. And as the country grows, the population experiences price hikes, higher cost of living, and yet, stagnant or even reducing of salaries.

Th above is simply one of the few reasons I have worked overseas for 8 years before I recently returned to Singapore to look after my parents. Even now, I find it difficult, as I am given half the salary of what I would have received elsewhere for the same position. Go figure.

Anonymous said...

Comparing to Malaysia, of course most probably not better than Singapore in many aspects, like the NEP is worse than our EEP = Elite Economic Policy.

One does need to think twice about going there especially for men who has already finished serving NS and earn the right to be a citizen. (But Jet Li need to transfer a few millions here to be a citizen)

But for the case of Canada, Australia and New Zealand, I think need not consider too much.

Anonymous said...

Comparing to Malaysia, of course most probably not better than Singapore in many aspects, like the NEP is worse than our EEP = Elite Economic Policy.

One does need to think twice about going there especially for men who has already finished serving NS and earn the right to be a citizen. (But Jet Li just need to transfer a few millions here to be a citizen and the few millions still belongs to him.)

But for the case of Canada, Australia and New Zealand, I think need not consider too much.

Anonymous said...

on another aspect, if you know how unsafe to stay in KL & JB, motorcycle gang, rob in petrol kiosk, park your car in mall being stolen or pointed by knive, most of my relatives staying in KL has been enter by robbery at least once.
You shared your food with housefly if you dine outdoor. The hygiene level of air-con food court or restaurant are still bad. Most top quality food & fruits in Malaysia shipped to Spore for higher profit. Foreign food in Malaysia also with lower grade than Spore eg. apple, grapes, meats....
Car price is cheap only you drive local brand like proton & perodua. Malaysia is a bigger country with big land, so they can have more space, that is for sure, but that does mean big is good. Tokyo & HK apartment is much smaller, but can be comfortable too if you design nicely.
If you are sick, send to malaysia hospital, 90% you will be attended by malay doctor, not discremination, their standard is not there yet, if you want to play a fool with your life, go ahead with them.
Children education, teach science & math in malay. Law, race unfairness, religious....you can say anything only when you are affected.

Lifey said...

The article by Vijay Kumar is not convincing at all. Vijay is not comparing apples with apples.
He is comparing a lower middle class to poor class life in SG with his life (a Middle class professional) in Malaysia.
He should realised that there are lots of poor people living in even more desolute conditions in Malaysia than the one described in his article. Comparing with those people will make a better form of comparison.
As for Cars, the price of cars is expensive in Singapore because of scarce land, Malaysia has much larger land, cars are Much cheaper there and more of a neccessity there.In Singapore, cars are not necessary a neccessity. Many people chose not to take cars since transportation is convenient and we do not have that much roads anyway.
Its true that there will be an underbelly in every country, in Singapore, at least the under previleged have a roof over his head. I will not say they are treated like princes but at least we don't see beggers or homeless or slum-dwelling poor people like our neighbouring countries.

Anonymous said...

Is there a way for me to downgrade from Spore citizen to PR? I want to be Malaysian citizen and Spore PR too...

I am an engineer. Over the past year, I have been squeezed out of my job by cheaper Chinese, Malaysian and Indian engineers. To them, $2000 is much when they remit back home. To me, I can’t even afford a HDB, as frugal as I try to be, because the foreigners keeps driving home prices up on a daily basis. To add insult to injury, more of the foreign graduates replacing me had their university fees paid by our very own Ministry of Education. These graduates were not only given free college education, they were even given a month allowance of few hundred dollars each. While I had to work part time to support my education in NUS, and I still remain in debt to my student loan. (BITTER LAUGH!!!!).

I spent 2.5 years of my precious youth serving the SAF, during which I lost my first girlfriend during training. These foreigners were given PRs and citizenship in less than 2.5 years and they don’t even need to serve. If war breaks out, I have to protect 1/3 of the population fuilled with these people?? (Assuming they dun run away at the 1st sign of trouble??!!) SAF even sent me a letter threatening to fine me for going overseas without telling them…to attend a funeral of my uncle…(BITTER LAUGH!!!!). Hey, here’s an idea, why don’t I migrate to another country before migrating back. That will save me more time!

I am working in odds jobs now 7 days a week. I am now almost 30 already. Inflation exceed my savings rate, and I find a home, marriage, kids and happy future beyond me. A simple illness or a year of unemployment could wipe me out. Yet the government is wondering why there are less marriages and births….(BITTER LAUGH!!!!)

I bear no love to my country now. My country does not need to be attacked, it has already be invaded and taken over. Thanks PAP!

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